Senate Tax Reform Legislative Text Clarifies Some Provisions

Earlier today, the Senate Finance Committee released legislative text of its version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.  Up until now, only “conceptual language” had been available.  The text clarifies some of the provisions that we have previously discussed in our posts about the Senate bill (see earlier discussions herehere and here) and includes new information reporting requirements that we have not previously covered:

  • The legislative text would disallow any deduction for meals provided at the convenience of the employer and meals provided in an “employer-operated eating facility.” If the employer chooses to offer food and beverages, they will remain excludable (to the extent currently excludable) from the employee’s income and wages under section 132, but the cost of providing them would not be deductible.  It is somewhat unclear what the effect of the deduction disallowance would be with respect to employer-operated eating facilities that collect sufficient revenue to cover their operating expenses.  Arguably, the provision could result in the employer recognizing revenue for the food and beverages sold to employees in the facility but having no deduction for the costs associated with selling food and beverages.  (Update: Upon further thought, we believe that the employer would not lose the deduction to the extent the employees pay for food and beverages purchased from the employer-operated eating facility because only the value of such food and beverages in excess of the amount paid is excludible from income under Code section 132(e) as a deminis fringe benefit.)  The new total deduction disallowance would be repealed for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2025, provided government revenue exceeds a target during the period 2018 through 2026.  The provision is effective if the cumulative on-budget Federal revenue from all sources for the 2018 through 2026 government fiscal years exceeds $28.387 trillion.
  • As expected, the text would eliminate the exclusion for bicycle commuting reimbursements, but in a surprise, the elimination is only temporary. The bill adds a new Code section 132(f)(8), which suspends the availability of section 132(f)(1)(D) from 2018 through 2025.  The exclusion would become available again in 2026.  This suggests that the Finance Committee’s decision to eliminate this exclusion may be driven more by revenue demands than by policy considerations, as it helps ensure the reconciliation bill meets the revenue target within the budget window.
  • Also as expected, the deduction for moving expenses and the related exclusion for qualified moving expense reimbursement were eliminated, but they too are only temporary suspensions. The bill would eliminate the deduction under Code section 217 and the exclusion under Code section 132(a)(6) (with an exception for active duty military moving pursuant to a military order and incident to a permanent change of station) from 2018 through 2025.  The exclusion would become available again in 2026.  Revenue demands likely also drove this change.
  • As we discussed in an earlier post, the Senate text makes changes to Code section 162(m) eliminating the exceptions for performance-based pay and commissions to the $1,000,000 deduction limitation for executive remuneration. However, unlike the conceptual language released earlier that contemplated an even broader expansion of the definition of “publicly held corporation,” the Senate text adopts a definition identical to the expanded definition in the House tax reform legislation (discussed here).  The Senate text does not include large private corporations as contemplated by the conceptual language.
  • The Senate text would add a new subsection (l) to Code section 272 that, as expected, eliminates the employer’s deduction for any expense, payment, or reimbursement for providing transportation to an employee in connection with travel between the employee’s work and the employee’s residence. This would eliminate the deduction for qualified transportation fringes, including van pool expenses, transit passes, parking, and other amounts excluded from the employee’s income under Code section 132(f).  This would seem likely to reduce the popularity of pre-tax transit programs under which employees elect to forgo taxable compensation in exchange for transit benefits, because the employer loses a deduction for compensation expenses that it would otherwise be entitled to as a result of the employee’s election to receive some of his or her compensation in the form of transit benefits.  The provision, as we speculated in an earlier post, does not carve out transportation reimbursements taxable to the employee.  For example, if an employee lives away from his tax home (i.e., his or her place of principal employment), the bill appears to disallow the compensation deduction if the employer elects to pay the employee for transportation costs between the employee’s residence and the office even though such amount is taxable to the employee.
  • As described in the Finance Committee’s conceptual language, the legislative text would adopt a new Code section 6050X. The language would require government agencies (or entities treated as government agencies) to report to the IRS and taxpayer on a new information return the amount of each settlement agreement or order entered into where the aggregate amount required that the government required or directed to be paid or incurred exceeds a threshold ($600, in the statute, but subject to adjustment by the Treasury).  The return must identify any amounts that are for restitution or remediation of property or correction of noncompliance, which are deductible, unlike fines and penalties paid under the agreement.
  • As also described in the Finance Committee’s conceptual language, the legislative text would also adopt a new Code section 6050Y that would create a new information reporting requirement for certain life insurance contract transactions. This includes: (a) a return filed and furnished by every person who acquires a life insurance contract or any interest in a life insurance contract in a reportable policy sale; (b) a return filed and furnished by each issuer of a life insurance contract upon notice of a transaction reported under (a); and (c) a return filed and furnished by every payor of reportable death benefits.  A reportable policy sale is generally the acquisition of an interest in a life insurance contract, directly or indirectly, if the acquirer has no substantial family, business, or financial relationship with the insured.  A reportable death benefit is an amount paid by reason of death of the insured under a life insurance contract that was transferred in a reportable policy sale.  The buyer must file the return required under (a) with the IRS and furnish copies of the return to the insurance company that issued the contract and the seller.  The insurance company that bears the risk with respect to a life insurance contract that receives a copy of a return required under (a) must file the return required under (b) with the IRS and furnish a copy of the return to the seller.  The payor insurance company   must file the return required under (c) with the IRS and furnish a copy of the return to the payee.  The reporting requirements would apply for reportable death benefits paid and reportable policy sales after December 31, 2017.
  • The Senate text would also adopt a new Code section 6050Z imposing three new information reporting requirements. The first would require taxpayers making research and experimental expenditures (as defined in Code section 174) to file an information return reporting the aggregate amount of such expenditures.  The second would require taxpayers making payments to a foreign person that is a related party (within the meaning of Code section 59A) to report the amount of such payments by type and any amount paid that results in a reduction of gross receipts to the taxpayer.  The third would require taxpayers that receive foreign-derived intangible income to file an information return that includes the aggregate amount of such income, the amount of foreign-derived deduction eligible income (as defined in section 250(b)(4)), and a certification that any foreign-derived deduction eligible income does not relate to the sale of products for any use, consumption, or disposition within the United States.  The text would impose a penalty of $1,000 per day up to $250,000 under Code section 6652(q) for failure to comply with these requirements.  The reporting requirements would be effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2024; however, it only takes effect (along with the associated changes to various deduction provisions) provided government revenue exceeds a target during the period 2018 through 2026.  The provision is effective if the cumulative on-budget Federal revenue from all sources for the 2018 through 2026 government fiscal years exceeds $28.387 trillion.

Impact of Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Part II – Deduction Disallowances for Entertainment Expenses and Certain Fringe Benefits

Yesterday, the House Ways and Means Committee released the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1) (the “Bill”), a bill that, if enacted, would represent the most substantial overhaul of the U.S. tax code in decades.  This is the second in a series of posts discussing the effect of the Bill on topics of interest to our readers.  (See our first post discussing the effect of the Bill on various exclusions for employer-provided benefits here.)  Section 3307 of the Bill makes several changes to the deduction limitations under section 274 related to meals and entertainment expenses.  The Bill also expands the reach of the deduction limitations to disallow deductions for de minimis fringe benefits excluded from income under Code section 132(e), unless the employer includes such amounts in the employee’s taxable income. With respect to tax-exempt entities, section 3308 of the Bill would treat funds used to provide employees transportation fringe benefits and on-premises gyms and other athletic facilities as unrelated business taxable income.

Total Disallowance of Deductions for Entertainment Expenses.  Under Code section 274(a), a taxpayer may not deduct expenses for entertainment, amusement, or recreation (“entertainment expenses”), unless the taxpayer establishes that the item was directly related to the active conduct of the taxpayer’s business, subject to a number of exceptions in Code section 274(e) (e.g., reimbursed expenses; expenses treated as compensation to (or included in the gross income of) the recipient; recreational, social, and similar activities primarily for the benefit of employees other than highly compensated employees; entertainment sold to customers).  If the taxpayer establishes that the entertainment expenses were directly related to the active conduct of its trade or business, section 274(n) limits the deduction to 50 percent of expenses relating to entertainment, subject to a number of exceptions, many of which are the same exceptions that apply to the 100 percent disallowance under Code section 274(a) (e.g., reimbursed expenses; expenses treated as compensation to (or included in the gross income of) the recipient; recreational, social, and similar activities primarily for the benefit of employees other than highly compensated employees; entertainment sold to customer).

The Bill would amend section 274(a) to eliminate the exception for entertainment expenses directly related to the active conduct of the taxpayer’s business.  Accordingly, deductions for entertainment expenses would be fully disallowed unless one of the exceptions under Code section 274(e) applies.  The Bill would also make changes to some of the exceptions under Code section 274(e), described below.

Disallowance of Deductions for On-Site Athletic Facilities.  Similarly, the Bill would fully disallow a deduction for on-site gyms or athletic facilities as defined in Code section 132(j)(4)(B).  Such facilities are gyms and athletic facilities that are located on the premises of the employer, operated by the employer, and substantially all the use of which is by employees of the employer, their spouses, and their dependent children.  Although the Bill would add such expenses to the list of disallowed deductions under Code section 274(a), the Bill does not eliminate the exclusion from employee’s income under Code section 132.  Accordingly, employers will be left to choose between (1) losing the deduction for the cost of such facility or (2) retaining the deduction by imputing the fair market value of the use of the facility to employees. The Bill includes instructions to the Treasury Department to issue regulations providing appropriate rules for allocation of depreciation and other costs associated with an on-site athletic facility.

Disallowance of Deductions for Qualified Transportation Fringes and Parking Facilities.  The Bill would also fully disallow a deduction for qualified transportation fringes as defined in Code section 132(f) and parking facilities used in connection with qualified parking as defined in Code section 132(f)(5)(C).  These fringe benefits are popular with employees and permit employees to either pay for an employee’s public transportation, van pool, bicycle, or parking expenses related to commuting on a pre-tax basis or allow employees to elect to receive a portion of their compensation in the form of non-taxable commuting benefits.  Like with athletic facility expenses, the Bill would add such expenses to the list of disallowed deductions under Code section 274(a), but retain the exclusion from employee’s income under Code section 132.  As a result, employers will be left to choose between (1) losing the deduction for the cost of providing these benefits or (2) discontinuing the benefits.  The Bill includes instructions to the Treasury Department to issue regulations providing appropriate rules for allocation of depreciation and other costs associated with a parking facility.

Disallowance of Deductions for Certain De Minimis Fringe Benefits.  The Bill would likewise disallow deductions for what it refers to as “amenities.”  Amenity is defined as a de minimis fringe benefit that is primarily personal in nature and involving property or services that are not directly related to the taxpayer’s business.  This would seemingly subject expenses related to the provision of most de minimis fringe benefits to a full deduction disallowance unless the expense qualified for one of the exceptions under Code section 274(e) (e.g., expenses for food and beverages (and facilities used in connection therewith) furnished on the business premises of an employer primarily for its employees; reimbursed expenses; expenses treated as compensation to (or included in the gross income of) the recipient; recreational, social, and similar activities primarily for the benefit of employees other than highly compensated employees; items available to the public; entertainment sold to customers).  It would perhaps leave unaffected some de minimis fringe benefits such as personal use of a copy machine.  Even with respect to de minimis fringe benefits that would likely qualify as amenities, it is unclear how much of an impact this would have, because many de minimis fringe benefits would likely qualify for one of the exceptions (for example, coffee, doughnuts, soft drinks, and occasional cocktail parties would likely remain fully deductible under Code sections 274(e)(1) and 274(n)(2)(B), provided they are provided to employees on the business premises of the employer).  Others, however, such as occasional sporting or theater tickets, gifts given on account of illness, and traditional holiday or birthday gifts, may well be affected by the disallowance.  The Bill includes instructions to the Treasury Department to define amenity in regulations.

Deduction Limited to Amounts Actually Included in Income.Code section 274(e)(2) contains an exception to the disallowance under Code section 274(a) to the extent an expense is treated as compensation to an employee.  Code section 274(e)(9) includes a similar provision for expenses treated as includible in the gross income of the recipient that is not an employee of the taxpayer as compensation or as a prize or award.  The Bill would limit the exception for entertainment expenses treated as compensation to (or included in the gross income of) the recipient to the amount actually treated as compensation (or included in gross income of) the recipient as it is with employees that are “specified individuals” under current law.  Code section 274(e)(2)(B) was adopted to impose this limitation with respect to certain senior executives following the decision in Sutherland Lumber-Southwest, Inc. v. Commissioner.  The Bill would extend the effect of Code section 274(e)(2)(B) to all recipients.  The limitation prevents a taxpayer from deducting a cost in excess of the amount required to be included in the recipients income, such as in the case of vacation travel on board corporate aircraft, where the cost of operating the flight often far exceeds the amount required to be included in the employee’s income under Treasury Regulations.

Deduction Disallowance Applies with Respect to Expenses Reimbursed by a Tax-Exempt Entity.  Under section 274(e)(3), a taxpayer that incurs an expense subject to the deduction disallowance in section 274(a) or 274(n) may fully deduct the expense if the expense is reimbursed by another party, provided that certain requirements are met.  The rule allows two parties as part of a reimbursement arrangement to effectively shift the burden of the deduction disallowance to the party between them.   Section 3307 of the Bill amends section 274(e)(3) to prevent the use of tax-exempt entity (that is not affected by the deduction disallowance under current law) to avoid the effect of the disallowance.

Full Deduction for Meals Excluded from Employee’s Income under Code Section 119.  Under Code section 119, the value of meals provided to employees for the convenience of the employer are excludable from the employee’s income.  Such meals, however, are currently subject to the 50% deduction disallowance under Code section 274(n) unless the meals are treated as being provided at an employer-operated eating facility that is a de minimis fringe benefit under Treasury Regulation § 1.132-7.  (This was the issue in the Boston Bruins decision (earlier coverage).)  Running counter to the general approach of the legislation—which seeks to eliminate corporate deductions for amounts not included in employee income—the Bill would amend Code section 274(n)(2)(B) include meals excludable from an employee’s income under section 119 in addition to amounts being excludable under section 132(e).  This change would appear to expand the ability of employer’s to fully deduct more meals provided to their employees.

With the exception of the last change, the Bill would seek to limit the ability of taxpayers to deduct entertainment expenses and expenses related to the provision of various excludable fringe benefits.  The provisions would be effective for amounts paid or incurred after December 31, 2017.