IRS Updates List of Countries Subject to Bank Interest Reporting Requirements

Last week, the IRS issued Revenue Procedure 2017-46 to supplement the list of countries subject to the reporting requirements of Code section 6049, which generally relate to reporting on bank interest paid to nonresident alien individuals.  The expansion is not unexpected, as this list of countries, originally set forth in Revenue Procedure 2014-64 and modified a handful of times since, will likely continue to expand as more countries enter into tax information exchange agreements with the U.S. in order to implement the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).  Specifically, the Revenue Procedure adds the Faroe Islands and Greenland to the list of countries with which the U.S. has a bilateral tax information exchange agreement, and adds Croatia and Panama to the list of countries with which Treasury and IRS have determined the automatic exchange of information to be appropriate.  Coverage of previous updates to these lists can be found here and here.

Prior to 2013, interest on bank deposits was generally not required to be reported if paid to a nonresident alien other than a Canadian.  In 2012, the IRS amended Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-8 in an effort to provide bilateral information exchanges under the intergovernmental agreements between the United States and partner jurisdictions that were being agreed to as part of the implementation of FATCA.  In many cases, those agreements require the United States to share information obtained from U.S. financial institutions with foreign tax authorities.  Under the amended regulation, certain bank deposit interest paid on accounts held by nonresident aliens who are residents of certain countries must be reported to the IRS so that the IRS can satisfy its obligations under the agreements to provide such information reciprocally.

The bank interest reportable under Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-8(a) includes interest: (i) paid to a nonresident alien individual; (ii) not effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business; (iii) relating to a deposit maintained at an office within the U.S., and (iv) paid to an individual who is a resident of a country properly identified as one with which the U.S. has a bilateral tax information exchange agreement.  Under Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-4(b)(5), for such bank interest payable to a nonresident alien individual that exceeds $10, the payor must file Form 1042-S, “Foreign Person’s U.S. Source Income Subject to Withholding,” for the year of payment.

IRS Makes Good on Promise to Issue Guidance Loosening Certain FATCA Reporting Requirements

Yesterday, the IRS issued Notice 2017-46, representing a welcome reprieve for U.S. financial institutions with respect to the collection of foreign taxpayer identification numbers (FTINs) required of them by the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) to avoid Chapter 3 withholding.  As we discussed in a prior post, an official with the IRS Office of Chief Counsel previewed this forthcoming guidance earlier this month and communicated that it was intended as a response to comments received by the IRS from withholding agents.  The new guidance delays the date on which U.S. financial institutions must begin collecting FTINs to January 1, 2018, provides a phase-in period for obtaining FTINs from account holders documented before January 1, 2018 that will end on December 31, 2019, and limits the circumstances in which FTINs are required.  For example, withholding agents will not be required to obtain FTINs on Forms W-8 that the withholding agent would otherwise obtain solely to avoid Form 1099 reporting or backup withholding, or in situations where a payment is not otherwise subject to reporting on Form 1042-S.  Additionally, withholding agents will not be required to obtain FTINs from an account holder in a jurisdiction that has not entered a reciprocal tax information exchange treaty with the United States or in a jurisdiction that does not issue FTINs to its residents.  Finally, withholding agents need not acquire FTINs for governments, international organizations, foreign central banks of issue, or residents of a U.S. territory.  The IRS will revise the Instructions for Form 1042-S, “Foreign Person’s U.S. Source Income Subject to Withholding,” to reflect the amended FTIN requirements.

In addition, Notice 2017-46 also provides a reprieve for certain Model 1 FFIs with respect to their reporting requirements, extending the time by which they must obtain and report U.S TINs for preexisting accounts that are U.S. reportable accounts.  For such accounts, the U.S. Competent Authority will not determine that there is “significant non-compliance” with obligations under a Model 1 intergovernmental agreement solely because of a failure to obtain and report a U.S. TIN, provided that the Model 1 FFI follows certain alternative procedures specified in Notice 2017-46.

The IRS intends to amend the regulations to reflect the rules announced in Notice 2017-46, but taxpayers may rely on the Notice until it issues such regulations.

IRS Updates List of Countries Subject to Bank Interest Reporting Requirements

The IRS has issued Revenue Procedure 2017-31 to supplement the list of countries subject to the reporting requirements of Code section 6049, which generally relate to reporting on bank interest paid to nonresident alien individuals.  This was an expected move, as this list of countries, originally set forth in Revenue Procedure 2014-64 and modified a handful of times since, will likely continue to expand as more countries enter into tax information exchange agreements with the U.S. in order to implement the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).  Specifically, Revenue Procedure 2017-31 adds Belgium, Colombia, and Portugal to the list of countries with which Treasury and the IRS have determined the automatic exchange of information to be appropriate.  Unlike the last set of additions to the list, set forth in Revenue Procedure 2016-56 (see prior coverage), no countries were added to the list of countries with which the U.S. has a bilateral tax information exchange agreement.

Prior to 2013, interest on bank deposits was generally not required to be reported if paid to a nonresident alien other than a Canadian.  In 2012, the IRS amended Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-8 in an effort to provide bilateral information exchanges under the intergovernmental agreements between the United States and partner jurisdictions that were being agreed to as part of the implementation of FATCA.  In many cases, those agreements require the United States to share information obtained from U.S. financial institutions with foreign tax authorities.  Under the amended regulation, certain bank deposit interest paid on accounts held by nonresident aliens who are residents of certain countries must be reported to the IRS so that the IRS can satisfy its obligations under the agreements to provide such information reciprocally.

The bank interest reportable under Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-8(a) includes interest: (i) paid to a nonresident alien individual; (ii) not effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business; (iii) relating to a deposit maintained at an office within the U.S., and (iv) paid to an individual who is a resident of a country properly identified as one with which the U.S. has a bilateral tax information exchange agreement.  Under Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-4(b)(5), for such bank interest payable to a nonresident alien individual that exceeds $10, the payor must file Form 1042-S, “Foreign Person’s U.S. Source Income Subject to Withholding,” for the year of payment.

IRS Releases Final Qualified Intermediary and Foreign Financial Institution Agreements

With the end of the year upon them, the IRS has kicked into high gear with a flurry of new administrative guidance. On the heels of yesterday’s release of final reporting rules on slot machine, bingo, and keno winnings, proposed rules on horse track, dog track, and jai lai winnings, and a revenue procedure on Certified Professional Employer Organizations, the IRS released final agreements for foreign financial institutions (FFIs) and qualified intermediaries (QIs) to enter with the IRS, set forth in Revenue Procedure 2017-16 and Revenue Procedure 2017-15, respectively.

FFI Agreement

FFIs enter into an FFI agreement with the IRS to become participating FFIs for purposes of Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) withholding and reporting obligations. The final FFI agreement set forth in Revenue Procedure 2017-16, which was previously published in Revenue Procedure 2014-38, applies to FFIs seeking to become participating FFIs under FATCA, as well as FFIs and branches of FFIs treated as reporting financial institutions under a Model 2 intergovernmental agreement (IGA).  The update was necessary because Revenue Procedure 2014-38 was set to expire on December 31, 2016.  Accordingly, the FFI agreement contained in Revenue Procedure 2017-16 applies to FFIs with an FFI agreement effective beginning January 1, 2017.

Changes were made to the FFI agreement generally to align with subsequent changes to IRS regulations, such as the withholding and reporting rules applicable to U.S. branches that are not U.S. persons. Additionally, several changes reflect the expiration of certain transitional rules provided in the 2014 FATCA regulations including those related to limited branches and limited FFIs.  (For additional information on the expiration of the transition relief for limited branches and limited FFIs, please see our prior post).  The FFI agreement also clarifies the presumption rules applicable to Model 2 FFIs, and the ability of Model 2 FFIs to rely on certain documentation for purposes of the due diligence requirements.

The FFI agreement also contains new certification requirements applicable to FFIs attempting to terminate an FFI agreement and clarifies that the obligations imposed with respect to the period the agreement was in force survive the termination of the agreement.

QI Agreement

A QI serves as an intermediary for payments of U.S. source income made to non-U.S. persons, and it must collect a taxpayer identification number from the payee, or else it must withhold 30% on the payment. When an intermediary acts as a QI, it may agree to assume the primary withholding and reporting obligations with respect to payments made through it for purposes of Chapter 3, Chapter 4, and/or Chapter 61 and backup withholding under Section 3406 of the Code.  When a QI assumes such responsibility, it is not required to provide a withholding statement to the withholding agent/payor making payment to it.  FFIs, foreign clearing organizations, and foreign branches of U.S. financial institutions and clearing organizations are eligible to enter into QI agreements by completing Form 8957 through the IRS website, as well as Form 14345.

Notice 2016-42 set forth a proposed QI agreement (prior coverage), which made revisions to the previous final QI agreement published in Revenue Procedure 2014-39.  The proposed QI agreement created a new regime that allowed certain entities to act as qualified derivatives dealers and act as the primary withholding agent on all dividend equivalent payments they make.  Several changes in the final QI agreement were made in response to comments on the rules applicable to qualified derivatives dealers (QDDs), including provisions that reflect changes to the treatment of dividend equivalents from U.S. sources and provisions clarifying that entities acting as QIs and QDDs must file separate Forms 1042-S when acting in each distinct capacity.  Some of the changes in the final QI agreement were previously announced in Notice 2016-76 (prior coverage).  However, the final QI agreement makes further changes based on anticipated revisions to the regulations under Section 871(m), which are expected to be published in January.

Additionally, the final QI agreement provides greater detail on the internal compliance measures that are to replace the external audit procedures previously applicable to QIs. The final QI agreement also eliminates the ability of limited FFIs to enter into QI agreements, as limited FFI status will no longer be available beginning January 1, 2017.  Additionally, QIs seeking to use documentary evidence to document an entity claiming reduced withholding under a treaty must collect certain information regarding the applicable limitation on benefits provision, though the IRS has enabled a two-year transition period for QIs to gather this information.  The final agreement also eliminates the ability of an NFFE seeking to become an intermediary with respect to its shareholders to enter into a QI agreement.  The QI agreement also contains a modified standard of knowledge to align with the reason-to-know standard adopted in regulations, and modified documentation requirements and presumption rules to align with IGA requirements.  Finally, the term of validity for a QI agreement is six calendar years, extended from the three years provided in the proposed agreement.  The updated final QI agreement is effective beginning January 1, 2017.

IRS Adds to Lists of Countries Subject to Bank Interest Reporting Requirements

Earlier this week, the IRS issued Revenue Procedure 2016-56 to add to the list of countries subject to the reporting requirements of Code section 6049, which generally relate to reporting on bank interest paid to nonresident alien individuals.  Specifically, the Revenue Procedure adds Saint Lucia to the list of countries with which the U.S. has a bilateral tax information exchange agreement, and adds Saint Lucia, Israel, and the Republic of Korea to the list of countries with which Treasury and IRS have determined the automatic exchange of information to be appropriate.

Prior to 2013, interest on bank deposits was generally not required to be reported if paid to a nonresident alien other than a Canadian. In 2012, the IRS amended Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-8 in an effort to provide bilateral information exchanges under the intergovernmental agreements between the United States and partner jurisdictions that were being agreed to as part of the implementation of the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).  In many cases, those agreements require the United States to share information obtained from U.S. financial institutions with foreign tax authorities.  Under the amended regulation, certain bank deposit interest paid on accounts held by nonresident aliens who are residents of certain countries must be reported to the IRS so that the IRS can satisfy its obligations under the agreements to provide such information reciprocally.

The bank interest reportable under Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-8(a) includes interest: (i) paid to a nonresident alien individual; (ii) not effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business; (iii) relating to a deposit maintained at an office within the U.S., and (iv) paid to an individual who is a resident of a country properly identified as one with which the U.S. has a bilateral tax information exchange agreement.  Under Treas. Reg. § 1.6049-4(b)(5), for such bank interest payable to a nonresident alien individual that exceeds $10, the payor must file Form 1042-S, “Foreign Person’s U.S. Source Income Subject to Withholding,” for the year of payment.

The list of countries will likely continue to expand as more countries enter into tax information exchange agreements with the U.S. in order to implement FATCA.

Regulations Limiting Refunds and Credits for Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 Withholding Due Soon

June 3, 2016 by  
Filed under Chapter 3, FATCA, IRS

John Sweeney, Branch 8 Chief in the IRS Office of Associate Chief Counsel International, said on June 2 that proposed and temporary regulations limiting refunds and credits claimed by nonresident alien individuals and foreign corporations for taxes withheld under Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 of the Code will be released soon.  According to Sweeney, who was speaking at the Federal Bar Association Insurance Tax Seminar, most of the work on the regulations is complete.

The IRS announced its intent to amend the regulations under Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 last year in Notice 2015-10.  According to the notice, the temporary regulations will amend Treas. Reg. §§ 1.1464-1(a) and 1.1474-5(a)(1) to provide that, subject to section 6401(b), a refund or credit is allowable with respect to an overpayment only to the extent the relevant withholding agent has deposited (or otherwise paid to the Treasury Department) the amount withheld and such amount is in excess of the claimant’s tax liability.  The IRS said the regulation is needed because allowing a credit or refund based on the amount reported as withheld on Form 1042-S represents a risk to the Treasury if a foreign withholding agent fails to deposit the withheld tax with the U.S. Treasury.  The IRS has limited ability to pursue foreign withholding agents for such failures making it difficult to recover the amounts allowed to be claimed as credits or refunds.

According to Sweeney, the regulations will adopt the pro rata method described in Notice 2015-10 for allocating the amount available for refund or credit with respect to each claimant. Under this method, a withholding agent’s deposits made to its Form 1042 account will be divided by the amount reported as withheld on all Forms 1042-S filed by the withholding agent to arrive at a “deposit percentage.”  Each claimant will then be allowed to claim as a credit or refund the amount reported on its Form 1042-S multiplied by the deposit percentage for the withholding agent.  The pro rata approach is necessary because of the inability for the IRS to trace deposits back to specific payments made to a claimant based on the information reported on Form 1042 and Form 1042-S.