Late Form W-2s Doubled, Penalties to Come

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July 12, 2017

The earlier filing deadline on January 31 for Forms W-2 resulted in more than double the number of late-filed returns, according to Tim McGarvey, Social Security Administration branch chief, who was speaking on an IRS payroll industry conference call.  He said that, to date, the SSA has received close to 50,000 late Form W-2 submissions, compared to an average of 25,000 late submissions annually in the past few years.  In response to an inquiry from the Tax Withholding & Reporting Blog, Mr. McGarvey indicated that the 50,000 submissions represent approximately 4 million late-filed 2016 Forms W-2.

In addition to the jump in the number of late-filed returns, Mr. McGarvey said that the number of Forms W-2c filed has also increased dramatically—up 30 percent from last year.  In response to an inquiry, Mr. McGarvey reported that the SSA has received approximately 2.7 million Forms W-2c in 2017, with some 2.2 million of those correcting 2016 returns.  That compares to a total of approximately 2 million Forms W-2c processed in 2015.

The January 31 deadline for filing and furnishing recipients with the Form W-2 and a Form 1099-MISC that reports nonemployee compensation (Box 7) became required under the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act to combat identity theft and fraudulent claims for refund (see prior coverage).

Late filers and those that struggled to provide accurate filings by the January 31 deadline should take steps now to prepare for the 2017 filing season.  Employers who provide taxable non-cash fringe benefits (such as the personal use of company cars) may want to consider imputing income for those benefits using the special accounting rule and flexibility in Announcement 85-113, if they are not already doing so.  Announcement 85-113 permits employers to treat non-cash fringe benefits as received on certain dates throughout the year (such as on the first of each month, each quarter, semi-annually, or annually).  It also allows employers to treat the value of non-cash fringe benefits actually received in the last two months of the calendar year as received in the following calendar year.  Making use of these rules can ease the year-end payroll crunch.  The earlier employers can provide copies of Forms W-2 to employees, the greater the chance there is for employees to identify errors and request corrections before the January 31 filing deadline.