Notice 2016-48 Implements PATH Act’s ITIN Changes, Clarifies Application of New Rules to Information Returns

The IRS recently issued Notice 2016-48 to implement changes to the individual tax identification number (ITIN) program that had been adopted by Congress.  The notice explains the changes made to the ITIN program, as well as how the IRS plans to implement those changes, and the consequences to taxpayers who do not comply with the new rules.

ITINs are issued to taxpayers who are required to have a U.S. taxpayer identification number but who are not eligible to obtain a social security number.  As discussed in an earlier post, the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act), signed into law in December 2015, made it more difficult for nonresident aliens to maintain valid ITINs by amending Section 6109 of the Internal Revenue Code, the provision that permits the IRS to issue taxpayer identification numbers and request information to issue such numbers.  Specifically, under the PATH Act, Treasury must move toward an in-person ITIN application process, ITINs must be renewed to avoid expiration, and ITINs must be used to file a U.S. tax return to avoid expiration.

Application Procedures.  Under the current application procedures, taxpayers may apply for an ITIN by submitting Form W-7, Application for IRS Individual Taxpayer Identification Number by mail or in-person.  Notice 2016-48 does not execute Congress’s directive to establish an exclusively in-person application program, instead continuing the current application procedures, while the IRS takes additional time to determine how to implement the PATH Act’s mandate.  The IRS announced that further guidance will be issued.

ITIN Expiration.  The PATH Act made ITINs no longer indefinitely valid.  Any ITIN that is not used on a federal tax return for three consecutive years will expire on December 31 of the third year.  Taxpayers with an ITIN that has expired because they have not used it in three consecutive years may renew the ITIN any time after October 1, 2016 by submitting Form W-7 and the required accompanying documentation.

The PATH Act sets forth a schedule by which ITINs issued before 2013 will expire.  That schedule, which is based upon the issue date of the ITIN, was modified by Notice 2016-48 because many individuals do not know when their ITINs were issued, making the PATH Act’s schedule impractical.  Under Notice 2016-48, ITINs will expire under a multi-year schedule based upon the fourth and fifth digits of the ITIN.  Under this renewal system, ITINs with the middle digits 78 or 79 will expire on January 1, 2017, and future guidance will set forth the expiration schedule for other middle digit combinations.  The IRS will send Letter 5821 to individuals who used an ITIN with the middle digits 78 or 79 on a U.S. income tax return in any of the previous three years, notifying them of the upcoming expiration.

The IRS will accept returns with expired ITINs, but it warns taxpayers that processing delays may result and certain credits may not be allowed.  The processing delays and unavailability of certain credits could result in additional penalties and interest and a reduced refund.

Information Returns.  Expired ITINs are permitted to be used on information returns, meaning that holders of expired ITINs that are only used on returns filed by third parties, such as the Form 1099 or Form 1042 series, are not required to renew their ITINs.  Filers of information returns are not subject to penalties under Section 6721 or 6722 for the use of an expired ITIN on information returns. (However, many individuals who receive such information returns are required to file U.S. income tax returns necessitating that they renew their ITINs.)