First Friday FATCA Update

Since our last FATCA Update, the IRS has published a reminder that foreign financial institutions (FFIs) required by FATCA to renew their FFI agreements must do so by July 31, 2017.  The IRS released an updated FFI agreement on December 30, 2016, that is effective on or after January 1, 2017 (see prior coverage).  All financial institutions (FIs) whose prior FFI agreement expired on December 31, 2016, and that wish to retain their Global Intermediary Identification Number (GIIN) must do so by July 31, 2017 to be treated as having in effect an FFI agreement as of January 1, 2017.  According to the IRS, a new “Renew FFI Agreement” link will become available on the FFI’s account homepage in a future update to the FATCA registration portal.

Generally, FATCA requires the following types of FIs to renew their FFI agreements: participating FFIs not covered by an intergovernmental agreement (IGA); reporting Model 2 FFIs; reporting Model 1 FFIs operating branches outside of Model 1 jurisdictions.  By contrast, renewal is not required for reporting Model 1 FFIs that are not operating branches outside of Model 1 jurisdictions; registered deemed-compliant FFIs (regardless of location); sponsoring entities; direct reporting non-financial foreign entities (NFFEs); and trustees of trustee-documented trust.

Since our last update, Treasury has not published any new intergovernmental agreements (IGAs), and the IRS has not published any new competent authority agreements (CAAs).  Under FATCA, IGAs come in two forms: Model 1 or Model 2.  Under a Model 1 IGA, the foreign treaty partner agrees to collect information of U.S. accountholders in foreign financial institutions (FFIs) operating within its jurisdiction and transmit the information to the IRS.  Model 1 IGAs are drafted as either reciprocal (Model 1A) agreements or nonreciprocal (Model 1B) agreements.  By contrast, Model 2 IGAs are issued in only a nonreciprocal format and require FFIs to report information directly to the IRS.

A CAA is a bilateral agreement between the United States and the treaty partner to clarify or interpret treaty provisions.  A CAA implementing an IGA typically establishes and prescribes the rules and procedures necessary to implement certain provisions in the IGA and the Tax Information Exchange Agreement, if applicable.  Specific topics include registration of the treaty partner’s financial institutions, time and manner of exchange of information, remediation and enforcement, confidentiality and data safeguards, and cost allocation.  Generally, a CAA becomes operative on the later of (1) the date the IGA enters into force, or (2) the date the CAA is signed by the competent authorities of the United States and the treaty partner.

The Treasury Department website publishes IGAs, and the IRS publishes their implementing CAAs.

First Friday FATCA Update

May 5, 2017 by  
Filed under FATCA, Information Reporting, IRS

Since our last monthly FATCA update, the OECD issued an array of guidance on country-by-country (CbC) reporting and automatic exchange of tax information (see prior coverage). In addition, the IRS released the Competent Authority Agreement (CAA) implementing the Model 1B Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) between the United States and Algeria entered into on October 13, 2015.

Under FATCA, IGAs come in two forms: Model 1 or Model 2. Under a Model 1 IGA, the foreign treaty partner agrees to collect information of U.S. accountholders in foreign financial institutions (FFIs) operating within its jurisdiction and transmit the information to the IRS. Model 1 IGAs are drafted as either reciprocal (Model 1A) agreements or nonreciprocal (Model 1B) agreements. By contrast, Model 2 IGAs are issued in only a nonreciprocal format and require FFIs to report information directly to the IRS.

A CAA is a bilateral agreement between the United States and the treaty partner to clarify or interpret treaty provisions. A CAA implementing an IGA typically establishes and prescribes the rules and procedures necessary to implement certain provisions in the IGA and the Tax Information Exchange Agreement, if applicable. Specific topics include registration of the treaty partner’s financial institutions, time and manner of exchange of information, remediation and enforcement, confidentiality and data safeguards, and cost allocation. Generally, a CAA becomes operative on the later of (1) the date the IGA enters into force, or (2) the date the CAA is signed by the competent authorities of the United States and the treaty partner.

The Treasury Department website publishes IGAs, and the IRS publishes their implementing CAAs.

First Friday FATCA Update

April 7, 2017 by  
Filed under FATCA, Information Reporting, IRS

Since our last monthly FATCA update, we have addressed the following recent FATCA developments:

  • The IRS updated the list of countries subject to bank interest reporting requirements (see prior coverage).
  • The IRS released new FATCA FAQs addressing date of birth and foreign TIN requirements for withholding certificates (see prior coverage).
  • The IRS extended the deadline for submitting qualified intermediary agreements and certain other withholding agreements from March 31, 2017 to May 31, 2017 (see prior coverage).

Recently, the IRS released the Competent Authority Agreement (CAA) implementing the Model 1B Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) between the United States and the Bahamas entered into on November 3, 2014.

Under FATCA, IGAs come in two forms: Model 1 or Model 2.  Under a Model 1 IGA, the foreign treaty partner agrees to collect information of U.S. accountholders in foreign financial institutions (FFIs) operating within its jurisdiction and transmit the information to the IRS.  Model 1 IGAs are drafted as either reciprocal (Model 1A) agreements or nonreciprocal (Model 1B) agreements.  By contrast, Model 2 IGAs are issued in only a nonreciprocal format and require FFIs to report information directly to the IRS.

A CAA is a bilateral agreement between the United States and the treaty partner to clarify or interpret treaty provisions.  A CAA implementing an IGA typically establishes and prescribes the rules and procedures necessary to implement certain provisions in the IGA and the Tax Information Exchange Agreement, if applicable.  Specific topics include registration of the treaty partner’s financial institutions, time and manner of exchange of information, remediation and enforcement, confidentiality and data safeguards, and cost allocation.  Generally, a CAA becomes operative on the later of (1) the date the IGA enters into force, or (2) the date the CAA is signed by the competent authorities of the United States and the treaty partner.

The Treasury Department website publishes IGAs, and the IRS publishes their implementing CAAs.

Singapore Seeks Reciprocal IGA to replace Nonreciprocal IGA Currently In Effect

August 3, 2016 by  
Filed under FATCA, Tax Treaties

During a state visit by Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, Singapore and the United States announced they were negotiating a reciprocal Model 1 IGA.  The countries had previously entered into a nonreciprocal Model 1 IGA in 2014 that went into effect on March 28, 2015.  Unless Congress enacts legislation providing for greater collection of information from U.S. financial institutions, the reciprocal agreement will provide for limited exchange of information regarding Singapore residents who maintain accounts with U.S. financial institutions.  The obligations of Singapore financial institutions would be unchanged.  As part of the effort, the countries are negotiating the terms of a Tax Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA), and continue to discuss whether an income tax treaty should be negotiated.  According to the statement, the countries hope to complete negotiations on the TIEA and reciprocal IGA by the end of 2017.

Treasury to Remove Jurisdictions from List of Countries Treated as Having IGAs in Effect

August 1, 2016 by  
Filed under FATCA, IRS

Last week, the IRS announced that on January 1, 2017, the U.S. Treasury will remove some jurisdictions from the list of foreign jurisdictions that are treated as having intergovernmental agreements (IGAs) in effect.  To remain on the list after December 31, 2016, each jurisdiction that seeks to continue to be treated as having an IGA in effect must provide to the Treasury a detailed explanation of its failure to bring an IGA into force and a step-by-step plan and timeline for signing the IGA, or if the IGA has already been signed, to bring the IGA into force.  Since 2013, the Treasury has provided a list of jurisdictions that are as having an IGA in force as long as the jurisdiction is taking “reasonable steps” or showing “firm resolve” to sign the IGA (if no IGA has been signed) or to bring the IGA into force.

As of today, the United States has signed IGAs with 83 jurisdictions and 61 of those IGAs are in effect.  Another 30 jurisdictions are considered to have an agreement in substance, but have not yet signed an IGA.  The jurisdictions who are treated as having an IGA in effect that have not yet signed an agreement or who have signed an agreement but not yet brought it into effect are: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Bahrain, Belgium, Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Curaçao, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Georgia, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Kazakhstan, Macao, Malaysia, Montenegro, Montserrat, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Seychelles, South Korea, St. Lucia, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, and Uzbekistan.

Under FATCA, an IGA is a bilateral agreement between the United States and a foreign jurisdiction to collect information related to U.S. accountholders at foreign financial institutions (FFIs) in the foreign jurisdiction and transmit the information to the IRS.  If a foreign jurisdiction lacks an IGA in force, then FFIs in that jurisdiction face greater FATCA compliance burdens.  First, they must register with the IRS as participating FFIs (rather than registered deemed compliant FFIs) to avoid the mandatory 30% withholding on payments of U.S. source FDAP income that they receive.  This subjects them to the full requirements of the Treasury Regulations governing FATCA rather than the streamlined procedures in the IGAs.  Further, they are often subject to conflicting obligations, because the foreign jurisdiction may have privacy or bank laws that conflict with the disclosure requirements of FATCA.

In the announcement, the IRS stressed that a jurisdiction initially determined to have shown firm resolve to bring an IGA into force will not retain that status indefinitely (e.g., if the jurisdiction fails to follow its proposed plan and timeline for bringing an IGA into force).  If the IRS determines that a jurisdiction ceases to be treated as having an IGA effect, an FFI in the jurisdiction generally will have to enter into a FFI Agreement to comply with the FFI’s FATCA reporting obligations within 60 days.